Nametags: Your Pets Need Them!

by Keri K. on January 18, 2010

Do ALL of your pets have nametags? There are lots of great reasons to have tags made for more than just your dog, who often requires them by law. Cats, ferrets and even rabbits – any pet that goes outdoors or just leaves the house – should have their own tags too!

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Pan, easily identified.

I started thinking about nametags again after spending my time helping out in the warehouse this holiday season. Having a shipping tote come by with someone’s brand new tags in it was always fun, because I love to see what names people have chosen, and imagine what kind of pet will be wearing them. (“Buttons” on a red heart-shaped tag? Probably a cute toy breed. “Blitzer” on a brass nameplate? Gotta be a serious hunting dog.)

Although our two cats are strictly indoor pets, I had their tags made as soon as we brought them home from the shelter. Pandemonium has a gold Star (he’s a winner!) and Dozo has a Disc (considered more manly than a star by my husband). The 14K gold complements their lovely black Majestic collars perfectly. No matter if we’re only going up the road to “Grandma’s” for the weekend, and will be outside only from the house to the garage, their collars and tags are on before we even get near the door. If they get lost, I want my boys promptly returned, not taken back to the shelter or adopted by whoever’s at the first friendly doorstep they find. Plus, a collar and tag will immediately mark them as “lost,” not “feral.” Some states allow landowners to dispatch of nuisance feral cats.

Pocus enjoying outdoor time.

Pocus enjoying outdoor time with his stainless steel tag.

Yes, our ferrets have tags too, because we like to occasionally take outdoor excursions and they have regular vet visits like all ferrets should. Just like a cat, having a harness and tag on our ferrets means that, if they should somehow escape, they’ll be recognized immediately as pets and not wild animals! I’ve read enough stories about people thinking they have a weasel or even “huge rat” in their yard that turned out to be a lost, very domesticated ferret – one who sadly won’t last long on his own.

Microchipping, where a tiny identifying device is painlessly placed under the pet’s skin, is also a popular and useful safety feature. However, it does not remove the need for having a visual identifier like a collar/tag that anybody can read. In fact, it’s not a bad idea to include a tag declaring that your pet has a microchip, and the chip’s ID number.

Time to update your pets’ tags, or maybe add them to a new, fashionable collar? Remember, there’s free shipping on all nametags and all cat and dog collars, harnesses and leads.

For even more reasons to tag your pets, like if they have medical issues, check out this article on nametags.


Keri is a lead catalog designer for Drs. Foster and Smith and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from UW-Stout. She shares a small home with her husband, two Chinese Crested dogs, two cats, two ferrets, several reptiles and amphibians, and 30-some gallons of freshwater planted aquariums. See more articles by Keri K.

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January 18, 2010 at 8:11 am

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